Tuesday, May 20, 2014

GRATITUDE TUESDAY: INDIE AUTHORS

Gentle Readers . . . and Maxwell, AND Independent Authors,

I love you, Independent Authors. You provide me with a job. I have a new manuscript to edit, and I'm very excited about it but I'm not revealing anything yet.

But you're more than a job to me, you Indies. You are the embodiment of courage––the courage required in your attempts to communicate with the world when you don't have anyone to announce that you've arrived, when you don't have that person who should get you a chair and a diet soda. You people rock. I'm proud of you all.

As a symbol for indie authors, I choose today to focus on Karl Schonborn. Don't worry, Karl. You won't get after-school detention.

In THIS BULLY FOR YOU POST, I hope I made the point that Karl's cleft lip and palate made it more difficult for him to speak to people, but this difficulty is a universal condition. We all struggle in one way or another to connect with humankind, and independent authors face that difficulty under unique conditions.

We write because we have something to say. Maybe lightning won't strike, and we won't find an agent or a publisher. That doesn't mean we stop. It means we find another way to communicate because we don't merely want to chat––we NEED to pass on the word to to the masses, unwashed or sparkling with cleanliness.

Karl works so hard to promote his memoir Cleft Heart: Chasing Normal, and I know many of you face a similar struggle. I say, Do not give up. You have something to share. If you didn't, then you wouldn't bother to write.

You can inform. You can teach. You can entertain.You can dole out words without fear that they'll dry up and you'll never again have anything to say. Your words are infinite, just as my love is.

Indies, you are part of the universal need for human interconnectedness, for oneness. You want to connect with your words, and I know it's tough. I've been published plenty, and I've been rejected plenty, too. I don't stop writing, and I don't want you to give up.

Karl couldn't give up from the time he was a little boy. He had to learn how to speak clearly, and bullies picked on him the whole time. You probably have bullies in your lives, too. These people are dream stealers. They tell you your writing is not appropriate, it's not good, it doesn't fit their pigeonhole in the market. So you look for good, constructive criticism and advice, not someone who wants to tear you down.

Karl became successful through hard work. His deformity and the bullies who harassed him pushed him to study medicine and ways to avoid violence. He's a great wordsmith, and funny, too. All manner of readers will find Cleft Heart an engaging and enlightening memoir. Moreover, healthcare professionals should read this book. It's the only one about a cleft by a person with a cleft.

Healthcare providers who aspire to treat the person, not just the disease, will love that Cleft Heart allows them to see beyond the early years of surgery. They'll see how this common birth defect influences the lives of their patients for years to come.

Educators, librarians, healthcare providers, and all y'all (I can't believe I just wrote all y'all; stop me before I turn into a southerner) can benefit from reading Cleft Heart and watching how Karl goes about promoting it. He is not one to give up, and I don't want you to give up, either.

Okay, now imagine me, fist in the air, I strike a pose––and scene.


Infinities of writing love,

Janie Junebug


You can order Cleft Heart at  http://goo.gl/MQfZ4C or http://goo.gl/ZY84Sb.




Karl Schonborn
  
Author Cleft HeartChasing Normal
        Love, tragedy, mystery and triumph.
"A poignant, heartfelt tale."
                Secretary of State John Kerry  
        -   KarlSchonborn.com  
Available at Barnes and NobleBooks Inc, Amazon  


Please note that I have not been compensated in any way for promoting this book.

32 comments:

  1. I admire your passion and drive, Janie Junebug. I can imagine you taking Sally Field's role in a remake of Norma Rae.

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    1. I've been thinking someone should remake that movie with me as Norma Rae. Academy Awards, here I come.

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  2. Hold on, are you Judd Nelson? That's the only person I know who gets a freeze frame with a fist in the air.
    Cleft palettes are harsh, that's why I donate to Smile Train.

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    1. As a matter of fact, I am Judd Nelson. I hide my identity behind this Janie Junebug facade. I'm also John Cusack, holding up the ghetto blaster because the girl I love has dumped me.

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  3. Clicked on BUY.
    I think we need a pic of that pose.

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    1. Perhaps when I've lost another 80 pounds.

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  4. Amen, sister! Indie authors are a courageous bunch in general, willing to put themselves out there while hoping their hard work is good enough to please the masses. It seems that the best ones are always those who have the need to write but who don't assume anything about success. They just want to get their story out there.

    Karl's story sounds like an incredible journey. Thanks for telling us all about it! I'll have to check it out.

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    1. I thought you'd like this post, sister dear.

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  5. I strongly endorse this book for the very reasons you've articulated so well here. A great book~

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    1. When you agree with something I say, I know I'm right.

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  6. You're doing a great service by promoting a book that reflects the burden of so many people.

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    1. But I laughed my ass off about you ordering breakfast in the restaurant.

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  7. Thanks for your rousing endorsement of Indies, Janie! And thank you for your continued kind words about Cleft Heart and my early, and continuing, efforts to communicate. I'm not speaking of mindless commuiques (cell calls from a bus telling someone you're now one stop closer to getting off), but the communication that truly makes the world go 'round.

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  8. Gasp! It's letting me comment again!

    I think I may be rubbing off on you. I'm sorry! I say "ya'll" every single day at work, when I'm speaking to a table with both males and females. Apparently, females don't like when a server walks up and says, "Hey guys, how are you doing today?" Which makes sense, except that I'm not implying that they got a sex change or look like men...

    Sorry again. Got off topic. This post made me really happy because sometimes, people just need a little bit of encouragement. Just a little reminder that somebody out there cares and wants them to succeed and be happy. I think it was perfect timing while you're doing the Bully posts.

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    1. Oh, so it's your fault that I used all y'all. You can say "Ladies and Gentlemen" to go after the more formal approach. You're right: people need encouragement. Very few people don't.

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  9. Karl's book is one I'll put on my list.

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  10. I thought I commented on this, but it must not have gone through. If I did, delete one! Anyway--I agree...it takes a lot of strength to pursue an independent publishing career. I don't know how the authors do it. The promotional work alone is exhausting me, and I have a publisher doing a portion of the work.

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    1. But I like it when you comment more than once. And it's great that you have a publisher.

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  11. I agree with all of the above. Well worth putting on my TBR list too.

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    1. Now that we have Wendy's approbation, we can forge ahead. Thank you, Wendy.

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  12. To those of you who've responded so positively to Cleft Heart, thank you!

    To Janie: You're so right about looking for positive, constructive responders to one's work. I think the gatekeepers for all kinds of artistic endeavor have a tough job since there are only so many financial resources for writers, painters, dancers and the like. Literary "deciders" may be angry about losing power in the digital revolution, but they should still try to be decent as they tell you "fail" or "not fail." To avoid bullying writers, they should take a cue from "good" parents who don't steal the dreams of their children.

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    1. So well said, Karl. Thank you for adding your thoughts.

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  13. To those of you who've responded so positively to Cleft Heart, thank you!

    To Janie: You're so right about looking for positive, constructive responders to one's work. I think the gatekeepers for all kinds of artistic endeavor have a tough job since there are only so many financial resources for writers, painters, dancers and the like. Literary "deciders" may be angry about losing power in the digital revolution, but they should still try to be decent as they tell you "fail" or "not fail." To avoid bullying writers, they should take a cue from "good" parents who don't steal the dreams of their children.

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    1. Well said again, Karl. I know it's frustrating when you don't know if your comments go through, and sometimes they don't. I wish I knew where they go. They're not in spam.

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  14. OK, I'm ready to rock the world now. You're one inspiring blogger, Janie Junebug.

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  15. Rock on, Carol Kilgore. Oh my soul. Blue jeaned baby queen. Prettiest girl I've ever seen. See her shake on the movie screen. Jimmy Dean. James Dean. I'm sorry. I got carried away.

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  16. Hey -- look at you using goo.gl. :)

    This whole post kicks so much butt! I do love the opportunities given to authors these days, and I appreciate so much when an indie author gives readers enough respect to engage the services of a solid editor like you. Doing so will only help the indie revolution to grow and thrive.

    Karl is an awesome and brave man to tell this story that so many need to hear.

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    1. What a nice comment, Vebarino. I kept your instructions about goo.gl. I'd be lost without you.

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  17. Oh I liked this post it was great and made me feel good

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