Wednesday, July 4, 2018

MY #METOO POST

Gentle Readers . . . and Maxwell,

Don't get upset or worried. I've never been raped or attaacked.

When I was younger, I got a lot of catcalls. Men came on to me in the grocery store even when I had a toddler with me and was wearing my wedding ring.

The "interest" from men was the worst when I was a reporter. Sometimes men I interviewed made suggestive remarks. A couple of guys followed me out to my car and didn't want to stop talking, apparently in the hope that I'd be so interested that I'd follow them to their beds.

A publisher once grabbed me by the arm––roughly––and I gave him holy hell in front of the entire newsroom and told him to never touch me again. He was quite respectful and careful after that. However, this anecdote doesn't mean that I think all women can get out of such situations as easily as I did. I wasn't worried about losing my job. I wasn't worried that I wouldn't be promoted.

In fact, when I applied for a different job several years later, the office manager called that publisher, who told the office manager that I had more integrity than anyone else he'd ever worked with.

My mind is on #METOO and it has been for quite some time. I have no problem with giving up reruns of Bill Cosby's sitcom because I didn't watch them anyway, but what do I do about the Woody Allen movies I love? What about Harvey Weinstein movies? Am I still able to separate the artist from the art?

On that note, I want to repeat a post I wrote a long time ago. I'll also be following up on this subject, so my #METOO will be continued. And if you'd like to share #METOO stories in a guest post on my blog, please email me at dumpedfirstwife@gmail.com.


Infinities of love,

Janie Junebug


I promised you a work of art that achieves transcendence despite its creepiness factor and here it is: Manhattan, starring Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, and Mariel Hemingway.

LOVE this movie.

The glory of Gershwin, the sweet loveliness of young Mariel Hemingway, the skyline of our beautiful city. This film is a love affair with New York, in glorious black and white.

Its creepiness factor? Woody Allen's character, Isaac, is having an affair with 17-year-old Tracy, played by the oh-so-innocent looking Mariel. It become even more creepy knowing that Woody had an affair with his now wife when she was quite young (she's still very young), and she grew up with Allen as the father figure in her life. 

Who has an affair with the daughter of his longtime girlfriend with whom he's had a child and lets Mama find out when she discovers nude photos of her daughter in her "husband's" apartment?

Woody Allen.

We all know it. We know it's wrong. But somehow most of us look past it (it's o.k. Mia we still love you) and we still love his films.

I am extraordinarily fond of Annie Hall. Was Diane Keaton ever more beautiful? La di da, la di da.

But it's Manhattan that I truly adore. 

It's magic.

I read on IMDB that Woody offered to make another picture for free for Universal if they would shelve Manhattan. He supposedly thought it was terrible and the worst thing he had ever done.

I hope he got over it, and if he didn't, then I disrespectfully disagree with him.



Isaac Davis: Chapter One. He adored New York City. He idolized it all out of proportion. Eh uh, no, make that he, he romanticized it all out of proportion. Better. To him, no matter what the season was, this was still a town that existed in black and white and pulsated to the great tunes of George Gershwin. Uh, no, let me start this over. 
Isaac Davis: Chapter One: He was too romantic about Manhattan, as he was about everything else. He thrived on the hustle bustle of the crowds and the traffic. To him, New York meant beautiful women and street smart guys who seemed to know all the angles. Ah, corny, too corny for, you know, my taste. Let me, let me try and make it more profound. 


It's profound, Isaac.

Splendor in the skyline, glory in the concrete. I love New York. And it just doesn't get any better than Rhapsody in Blue.

I published this post on Sept. 21, 2010. Prior to writing this defense, I wrote a post about One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest that you can read HERE if you're so inclined.



Mariel Hemingway in Manhattan

37 comments:

  1. Funny--I have never card much for Woody's movies. I loved Diane Keaton in Annie Hall, but his character drove me nuts. (He plays the same character in all his movies if he is in them or has some other actor play a similar whiny character if he isn't--LOL!) Maybe New Yorkers appreciate him, I don't know. Somebody obviously does. He has done quite well for himself. ;)

    I do think I can try to separate the work. I loved the early Bill Cosby, but didn't like his show for very long and quit watching. That was long ago before we knew he was a rapist.

    I still love Kevin Spacey's work and had always liked Charlie Rose's program, for example. But there's a taint on them now. So watching them might be different, to be honest.

    Besides the usual unacceptable advances, milder forms of attack, and verbal abuse that was common growing up in the 50s and 60s...I've been physically kidnapped, beaten and raped. There's a huge difference between crude and rude men that were allowed to be so back then and being physically assaulted--even pinned against walls and groped...let alone being raped. Men patted woman on the ass all the time--even in the 70s when I was a waitress. There's a difference. And I am glad that none of it is acceptable anymore. Really glad! :)

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  2. Is there a female alive who hasn't been unwantingly pawed or made uncomfortable at work or school?
    :O

    I am a fan of Woody Allen's work. The guy-- I don't know him. But the work is part of the American masterpieces treasury. Thank you, sister, for this post.

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  3. It is a really tricky area where I think we can (mostly) make our own decisions. Many artists (whatever their genre) were encouraged/assisted/allowed to behave badly. Some of them jumped at the chance. I deplore their behaviour. However, if their work doesn't promote such behaviour, surely we can look at it as a separate entity? Not explaining this well, but I hope people can understand.

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  4. One of our favorite movies is "Radio Days." Woody Allen narrates it, but he's not in it, thank goodness. I already own a copy, so watching it again won't make a difference in the grand scheme of things. This past week hubby and I have been watching the old show, "You Bet Your Life" with Groucho Marx on YouTube. He interviews his contestants and really ogles the pretty women and says very inappropriate things to them. It's quite shocking actually. He even asked one lady, "So do yo you work or are you a housewife that does nothing all day?" Some episodes are older than me and sadly they are more interesting to watch than most everything else that's on TV nowadays. lol

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    1. The role of "housewife" is still denigrated.

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  5. You gave him holy hell in front of the entire newsroom? Serves him right. That bastard. Pardon my Swedish.

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  6. Good on you for standing up for yourself. I recently read something (that I need to confirm) that kinda shed some light on the whole male attention thing. (Again it might be bogaheesh.) Supposedly women exude pheromones via the air, or by breathing and men send them via touch, especially of the hands. Anyhow...

    That movie isn't one that I'd enjoy. Anything involving creepy guys and incest, not so much my brand of cheese.

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  7. Hi Janie - I'm glad these things are getting aired and hope that the worst offenders will get their just due. Take care and enjoy the 4th - cheers Hilary

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    1. I hope justice will prevail, especially when it comes to Trump.

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  8. Not a fan of Woody Allen. He has always creeped me out; his movies likewise.

    But I'm sure there are probably movies I've liked whose actors or directors wouldn't be my cup of tea either. So I do think you can separate the person from the product.

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    1. So many people have engaged in abhorrent activity that if we didn't watch their movies or TV shows or read their books, we wouldn't have much to watch or read. That goes for non-celebrities, too. We've all done some shameful things. Or maybe I've done some shameful things and everyone else is fine.

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    2. I think most people have done something or more than one something!

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  9. What has been seen cannot be unseen. What has been learned cannot be unlearned.

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  10. Don't like Woody Allen never had he is a creepy guy, I did like Bill Cosby and to be honest I can still see me watching movies or TV shows that these creeps have been involved with because there are others in them that are not creeps. If I like the product then I will watch it

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  11. A lot of people love Woody Allen's artistic talent.
    He's just never done it for me. And then when I heard about his private life the creepy factor really kicked in.

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    1. I understand that some people don't care for his movies. I love many of them, but not all.

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  12. I loved Annie Hall. But I don't love Woody Allen. I love music by artists that I don't like or respect.

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  13. Goon on you for standing up for yourself. Why do some men think its okay to treat women like that? That has happened to me too. All I think when they start talking is "ew". How can they think being disrespectful, or aggresive is attractive?

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    1. In some of their stupid little brains, they believe that treating women badly will get them what they want.

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  14. I never did like Woody Allen. I used to love Bill Cosby. We saw him live in San Francisco once--great show!! Being Jewish, I now hate (but used to love) Mel Gibson. Why can't some men learn to keep their pants & lips zipped?

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  15. I was never into Woody Allen but Bill Cosby's shows were a different story. He has really disappointed.

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    1. There were rumors about Cosby when his show was so popular. The truth turned out to be much worse than the rumors.

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  16. Good for you for sticking up for yourself, Janie! I think most of us have been unpleasantly accosted at one time or another. It's appalling how many assholes are out there and good that they're being exposed, now. I've never been a huge fan of Woody Allen's and think he's a total creep, but I do love "Midnight in Paris". One of my favourite movies, in fact. For me, separating the artist from the art has never been difficult and I don't consider it supporting their bad behaviour if I appreciate their creative works. Enjoy art for art's sake. ☺

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    1. I saw a few of Robert Mapplethorp's photographs recently. Some people are offended by his work. What I saw was beautiful. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder?

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    2. He was an amazing photographer! Were they offended by the nude pictures? That's a North American quirk, I think. Where I was born (Germany), nudity is commonplace in all media and nobody thinks anything of it. The human body is a natural thing and the subject of much great artwork.

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  17. I'm glad you stuck up for yourself. Good for you! Sadly, I don't think I would have it in me to unleash holy hell in a situation like that. And that is awful to admit. I'd like to think I would defend myself in other situations, though, but you never know until you're in that place.

    I'm not a fan of Woody Allen or Weinstein movies, so I have no problem not watching those.

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